Archive

Monthly Archives: July 2018


kaleLast week’s post was about how we can control garden pests. Once we get our garden plants to the point where we are starting to harvest, it’s time to figure out what to do with all of the excess.
First, we’ll start out with a little riddle: What do you call a person who buys zucchini from the grocery store in July? For the answer to this and some answers about using zucchini, look at this article.
What should you do with all that Zucchini? https://hubpages.com/living/What-To-Do-With-All-That-Extra-Zucchini
There’s nothing like a vegetable garden where you can pick fresh food right from your own back yard. However, those don’t do you any good if you don’t pick the vegetables and use them. Here are some of my favorite tips for using the vegetables you pick even if you don’t have a lot all at one time.

4715759467_6c46d6a181
Using Every Vegetable in my Summer Vegetable Garden https://hubpages.com/living/Making-Full-Use-of-the-Vegetable-Garden
Back several years ago, I had an incident that convinced me that:
Using a Deep Freezer Shouldn’t Be the Only Home Preserving Method https://hubpages.com/food/What-I-did-When-My-Freezer-Failed

If you’re not sure what home preservation method to use for all that excess in the garden, check out these two articles about this subject:
Home Preservation Methods—Advantages and Disadvantages https://delishably.com/food-industry/Home-Preservation-Methods-The-Advantages-and-Disadvantages
Home Preservation Methods—Advantages and Disadvantages Part II https://delishably.com/food-industry/homepreservationadvantagesanddisadvantagespt2

Of course, there won’t always be excess vegetables in your garden. Because of this, I am including an article about how to save space in the garden. Often I like to plant seeds around the mature plants in the garden so that I can grow additional crops from the same area to save space. For more information about how to save space and time in the garden check out:
Tips for Saving Space and Time in the Vegetable Garden https://hubpages.com/living/Dos-and-Donts-for-Saving-Space-and-Time-in-the-Vegetable-Garden

Yes, it is still summer, but in many parts of the county, it won’t be long before summer will be over and autumn will be here. Here are 20 tips to do this fall that will make your garden next year even better!
20 Fall Vegetable Gardening Tips For Better Results in the Spring https://hubpages.com/living/20-Gardening-Tips-This-Fall-To-Give-yourself-A-Head-Start-In-The-Spring

Get these tips and more when you purchase Cygnet Brown’s book Simply Vegetable Gardening

Available on Kindle: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JHV15G6

Available in Print: http://www.lulu.com/shop/donna-brown/simply-vegetable-gardening-simple-organic-gardening-tips-for-the-beginning-gardener/paperback/product-21579298.html

 


 

4715759467_6c46d6a181This time of year, our gardens are planted, and we’re weeding, cultivating and mulching our crops to get the most from them. As we’re starting to harvest many of our summer garden vegetables, we discover yellow eggs on the underside of our green beans and a few days later we find that something is eating the green bean leaves. If you know anything about insects, you probably know that the bean beetle left his calling card.  More than likely, we’re probably also fighting battles against all kinds of crawling and winged creatures which are trying harvest our plants before we can.

 

One solution could be to get out a sprayer and spray your plants with pesticides. Personally, this would not be my choice. I like to use natural ways of controlling pests.

 

Top The Garden Insect Pests and How to Control Them https://hubpages.com/living/Top-Ten-Garden-Insect-Pests-and-How-to-Control-Them

 

Natural Garden Pest Management https://hubpages.com/living/Controlling-Bugs-in-my-Garden

Just because you see a bug on your plants, doesn’t mean that bug is harming your plants. Some are actually helping you keep the bad ones at bay.
Read Not All Bugs are Bad https://hubpages.com/living/Not-All-Insects-in-the-Garden-are-Bad

If you’re still having problems with bugs, try diatomaceous earth before pulling out the chemical spray can. Why I use Diatomaceous Earth in My Home and Garden https://hubpages.com/living/DEinhomeandgarden

DE Photo

When looking to decrease caustic chemicals around house and yard, very few substances aid in this process better than diatomaceous earth. Diatomaceous Earth (also known as DE) is fossilized remains of tiny aquatic hard-shelled algae called diatoms in powdered form. This substance can be used in numerous ways around the house and yard as a relatively safe substitute for caustic chemicals. Discover how others have used diatomaceous earth in many ways including as an insect barrier around your home, an insecticide against biting insects, a moisture control agent, a polishing agent, and in detoxing the body

Get Your Copy in digital format here

 


Thank you so much, Elisabeth Zguta for this guest post. I highly recommend her books. They are quite the page turners. Today Elisabeth is sharing her writing process,

Take it away, Elisabeth’

There’s much to know regarding publishing today. In the past ten years or more new trends have developed. The old way of doing things changed fast, and the familiar has been replaced with newer and better models. Yesterday’s traditional publishing is now more like a ‘vanity press’ today because it doesn’t guarantee anything except the imprint’s name on the inside cover.

Most of the work needs to be done by the author.

To do well in publishing, you must learn your craft and continue to grow as a writer, learn how to market, and you definitely need to invest your time.
No dream of writing a book is wrong unless you think that you don’t have to do the work for it to become a reality. If you anticipate instant gratification—think you can throw some words together, slap it into an eBook, and reap great rewards—well, think again!

hand-pointing-out-rev George Hodan
Photo credit to George Hodan

This is a competitive market. You need to present your best work, not perfect, but the best you can offer at the time. Know this—publishing is a long road. You most probably won’t become famous with your first book, but you are more likely to have an impact with your fourth, and the odds are better still with your tenth . . . it’s a long journey. The great thing about Indie Publishing is the support most indie authors offer each other.

What we all have to do:

• Write a great story for fiction or present an entertaining topic for non-fiction.
• Edit in stages (developmental & context) then perform or hire the final proof editor. Don’t forget to read your work aloud, the best way to know if the story is engaging is to hear it. Better yet, read it with a reader friend.
• Format the work for various platforms: mobi file for KDP, epub file for other digital distributors like Kobo and Apple, pdf file format for POD (print on demand) for print books for physical stores and libraries. (Some authors choose not to publish a printed edition, though I don’t understand why.)
• Design the inside and the outside. Add a call to action to join your email list inside the book. Create or purchase a compelling cover. First impressions are important, the average first glance is seconds . . . So get it right.
• Final proof. Once you load your completed files go over the proof in each format. DO NOT SKIP this part because often there’s a weird quirk on a random page smack in the middle, hiding for your reader! For your digital book proofs, check all the links and make sure the TOC (Table of Content) works for each section.

My writing process is one that suits me, and it may work for you as well.

I write and rewrite as I go.

Recently there was an interesting article about this by Dean Wesley Smith who labeled this as “Cycling and the Art of One Clean draft” rather than rewriting. Read the post and the comments, too. You may agree or disagree, but the main idea is to stay in touch with the creative process or ‘muse’ for lack of a better word.

There are the two schools of writers: pansters and outliners. Some writers preach and prefer to outline first, and I guess I do a slight version of outlining to get myself started. But detailed outlines, in my opinion, interrupts the creative process. A skeletal framework can help to keep yourself on track while letting your free writing have room to roam. (IMO detailed outlining is best saved for non-fiction).

If you want to know what your goal is then use a simple outline as a guide for your first draft.

There are tools available as prescribed by Editor Shawn Coyne. Check out his book and website: The Story Grid There are two tools: the Story Spine and the Foolscap Global Story Grid. The Story Spine is a three-sentence outline that provides direction for when you’re writing the first draft, leaving room for your story to develop organically.
Later on, you could use the Foolscap which is a more detailed method that works best after you’ve completed the first draft. This is used to identify anything you might have missed for the genre you’re writing, basically tying things together suited for the chosen genre specifically.

Back to my beginning writing process: After the simple outline idea is defined, then I write.

Each time I sit to write, I go back a little and go over what’s already on the page and then continue. Every so often, approximately ten chapters or less, I stop and compile my work in progress into a temporary eBook format and open it on my iPad. Reading it aloud, I highlight where to make changes or fix things, then go back to my computer, correct the errors or add the new idea that popped up that may have enhanced a scene, and then I continue on.

axelle b

Photo credit: axelle b

You can do this with any digital device (sometimes I compile and do a quick format into a mobi file and load onto my Kindle device for a change). If you don’t know how to format into digital reader formats, then use Calibre a freeware.
1. First save your document as a pdf file, easy to do in Word (save as pdf) or similar programs.
2. Then load this free software, which is a great digital library organizer to have on your desktop.
3. Upload the saved pdf file to the Calibre Library
4. Then use the option to convert it into mobi and/or epub file.
It’s simple, especially for people who learn hands on. Here’s a quick how-to video that might help. https://calibre-ebook.com/demo
My reason for doing proof reading/editorial review this way is two-fold:
1. First, reading it on a different device helps you see the mistakes that your eye rolls over while working on your computer.
2. Second, it is environmentally friendly, rather than wasting paper.
Some genres are easier to write than others, and each story is unique. One manuscript may need additional guides like time-lines (which need to be updated whenever you make changes). You may have to check back to your research if you can’t recall an important fact (especially if writing historical fiction or something using science as a backdrop). In my experience, it’s easier to verify the info while on that spot rather than relying on your memory to go back and fix it later. It saves time to fix as you go.
I use Scrivener to write. The software helps to make quick work of doing changes using the note card feature (corkboard feature). Also, you can get a quick review of the progress by downloading the worksheet file to see the stats (like word counts per scene, short descriptions of what happens, etc. I fill in brief details as I go). You could do this manually, use index cards, but I’m a software junkie.

Use this tool to check if the scenes are working (by the brief notes about each scene), check if the flow is there to meet the expectations for your genre, and the chapter lengths, etc. Basically, I do the same as the Foolscap but as I go. Anything you deem essential to your story can be checked and tracked.

Here are instructional videos to help you get started if you’re interested. There is a marginal cost, but worth every penny in my opinion.

Do not wait

EZ Indie Design

What you can do to stay inspired while writing:

• Grab photos while you research, use them for inspiration in between writing sprees. This works well to inspire cover ideas, ads, and book trailers later, too.
• Play music that inspires your story theme while writing, or better yet, in between your writing, so it keeps your mind working while doing other things. For example, if you’re writing Sci-fi listen to futuristic music, like the score of Star Wars or Techno music. If you write romance, then listen to more moving themes like the score of Romeo and Juliet. You get my drift.
• Watch movies that have the same story topic to keep your subconscious mind working on your own story. If you’re writing a Western Romance, then watch some John Wayne movies, if writing a historical fiction then tune into the History Channel.
If you haven’t heard this already, it is never too early to market your book. Many successful launches actually begin months before the book is even released. If you can use some of the elements of marketing also to help provide encouragement for you to keep writing, then it’s the best possible scenario.
If you’re into Pinterest this is a great time to use it as a tool. You can begin building some buzz about your book by the boards you create. If you’re writing about elves, add a board about fairytales and elves. Add and search clips to interact with people who also like elves—chances are they will be your perfect target market.
If you’re not into pin boards, then maybe you’d enjoy using YouTube and create a channel. Make quick videos (best to keep them timed to 1 minute or less). Use the ideas from your story to create smart video clips (they can be shared on Facebook, Twitter, MeWe, G+, and Instagram) If you’re writing a gardening book, take pics of your favorite flowers or veggies, add music and voila! Here’s a basic how-to from scratch.

A word of caution: Whenever you create something to share publically using another artist’s work, you must be respectful of the copyrights. You cannot use other people’s photos, music, fonts, etc. without permission unless they are specifically noted as ‘public domain, free to use’ or are labeled ‘may use as long as you give credit (CC) Common License can be partial use like for educational purposes only. Find the boring details here if you have a question: Copyright Law

kai Stachowiak photographer
Photo credit: kai Stachowiak

What you should do to build momentum about the book while writing:
• Talk about your book topic when you’re on social media, give updates on your progress, or say things (without giving away your story) that will peak interest in your book. It’s referred to building the Book BUZZ . . . Read more here at Build Book Buzz blog with Sandra Beckwith
• Create or join a group who’s interested in the topic of your book. You may even get additional inspiration or ideas from other group members to help solidify your characters or plot twists.
• Guest blog for other bloggers who have the same interests as in your book.
• Use social media as a tool to talk up your book and hook potential readers (Highly suggest to stay off hot-button topics that could hurt your reputation or close doors to potential customers)

social-media-icons-markers Animated Heaven

Photo credit: Animated Heaven

It’s easy to wander from your main idea while publishing; there’s a lot of advice and tactics offered, and everyone has an opinion (myself included), and it’s hard to see what works from a waste of time. Find what works best for you.

Each book deserves its own launch, and it is essential to make a plan.

Some can be launched with a direct approach (usually right for non-fiction). Other books may require you to take the scenic route (especially when your genre is very specific). There are silent launches, which is a continuous flow of information to interest potential readers. There are also celebratory launches that involve live events, either on social media or in person, like a book launch party or book launch blog party. It can be as elaborate or as low-key as you want. In person or via social media. The goal is always the same—to get your book out there!

I have to admit, some of the ‘should do’s’ listed above I haven’t done. Everyone has time limits, and it’s important that you discover yours. Use the most effective avenue to fit your schedule and get the biggest bang for your time spent. You should totally do as much as you can—hell, you may have more ideas that you can develop that never made my list. I hope so.

I’m an advocate for self-publishing, believe that the tools are there for us, and you can do it if you have the desire and work ethic to get it done. You can be a publisher.

Use the platforms that work well for you, don’t spread yourself too thin, and make efficient use of the direction you’ve chosen to take.

Focus on your project—it’s essential!
Keep reading – Keep writing!

Thank you, Cygnet Brown, for your guest post spot.

If you’re interested in learning more about Indie Publishing and don’t know where to begin, please visit my website which will point you in the right direction to discover the best publishing information for today. Visit EZ Indie Publishing .com

Elisabeth_Zguta_Author

Elisabeth Zguta
Independent Author

Books by Zguta (1)

EZ Indie Publishing EZ Indie Design

Credits:
Dean Wesley Smith
Shawn Coyne
Sandra Beckwith
Photographers from PublicDomain.net
Calibre software
Scrivener software
Pinterest
You Tube


Advantages to Traditional Publishing

bookshelf

When I first thought about writing a book, I thought the same way that so many other would be authors thought. I imagined getting huge advance and being given the royal treatment when I went into New York City to meet my publisher. I imagined a limousine picking me up at the airport and driving me to an amazing suite where I would stay a week while I hit the circuit of going from television station to radio stations, to other interviews, having my own makeup artist and hairstylist, going shopping in the Fashion District and even seeing a Broadway show while I was there.
After my visit, the publishing company would distribute my book and put it in the front of the store in every major book seller in the country. I would be given a number of copies of my books that I could share with my family and friends, and I would “live the dream”.
Nice dream. Reality was far different. I learned later that advances were seldom given to new authors (although I have met one).

Disadvantages to Traditional Publishing

The first thing that I learned was that when an author signs a contract with a traditional publisher, the contract always benefits the publisher at the expense of the author. The contracts are written in legalese so if the author doesn’t have a lawyer to look over the contract, the author might have to do things that they didn’t realize was not to their benefit. I heard of one author’s contract where she had to pay the expenses for attending book signings in distant cities. She was paid a set amount per book, but the number of books that she was able to sell was not enough to pay for her expenses. I had another friend had to buy copies of his own books so that he could sell them at live events. He made more money selling at the live events than anything that the publisher did for him. In addition, the publisher wouldn’t allow him to sell his books in digital format at all. Both had sold their rights to their publisher so they had no recourse. I have heard of other authors who had sold all their rights to publishers. The author has to make changes in manuscripts, might have to use a title and cover design of the publisher’s choosing. The author might not have any say at all.
I also learned was that the traditional publishing process takes about two years before you ever get your book on the shelves. Afterwards, if you were one of the lucky few who were able to get an advance, you won’t get paid until you sell enough books to pay your advance.

Self-Publishing

While I was learning all about traditional publishing, I started looking into self-publishing. The differences were enlightening. There was no promise of any advance. Before I was ever able to sell a book, I would have to put out money for editing, formatting, and cover design.
Of course, there are other problems with self-publishing. There’s a huge learning curve and expense to self-publishing that doesn’t exist with traditional publishing. I would have to take charge of marketing and book distribution. Getting into major bookstores would be difficult and advertising would be on my own dime as well.
I found however that self-publishing has its advantages. As a self-publisher, I own my own work. I have complete control over the content of my book, editing, formatting and cover design. I have complete control over the creative process. I can decide how I market my books, both on-line and off-line. I can handle my own distribution by working directly with independent book stores. I can determine whether I want to go on a book signing or attend a specific event. I can decide what public relations I want to be a part.
As a self-publisher, I can set my prices and can earn 70 percent or more of the cost of the books that I wrote and designed. As a self-publisher, I am a creative and an entrepreneur.


To Do List FormulaI personally have been working on a book about how to change habits. Recently I read a book that I believe would be a great companion book to this book. The book is called The To Do List Formula, A Stress-Free Guide to Creating To-Do Lists That Work by Damon Zahariades. It is a how-to book that does exactly what it says it does.
When I first saw the title, I thought that it was one of those books that just goes through a system of making a to-do list and it was some sort of system that gives a complex system that I would never be able to do.
I was pleasantly surprised when I started reading and the book, instead of what I expected, this book explained the pros and cons of other systems and then showed a to-do system that incorporated the best of the other systems.
The To Do Formula explained how to incorporate a to-do list into an overall system that gets it done. Zahariades shows how to use a to-do list to accomplish lifelong goals. He also tells us how to use a calendar along with the to do list to make the best use of the time.
The to do list formula is simple and as the author says many times during the course of the book, it is easily adaptable to your personal needs. I highly recommend this book and I would give it five stars out of five. This is one book that I will go back to again and again. I plan to utilize many of the techniques recommended in this book including using the app todolist.com.

If you want to get more done every day, add this book to your reading list and make Zahariades recommendations your own.


smoothieBack in March, I was feeling achy all over. I think I must have had arthritis in every joint and I could barely walk up the stairs without losing my breath. I had so much pain in my ankles that I could hardly walk. I don’t do pills and exercise seemed out of the question as the healthful starting point for a healthier lifestyle. I knew that food was the better starting point for me.  I was eating all sorts of junk food, too many animal products and processed foods. I knew that a traditional diet plan was not the right move for me, so I decided to simply change some of my food choices and I knew that the easiest place to start was with breakfast, my first meal of the day.

I started by adding what I am now calling Triple K. Kale, Kelp and Krill taken every morning has improved my health exponentially. 

Kale

kaleThe first item K that I include in my breakfast is kale. Every morning I include kale in my morning smoothie. Now, don’t stick up your nose at it until you’ve tried it. This smoothie is delicious. I put kale in a blender and blend it until it is fully chopped, add a little soymilk (men should never use soymilk because of the phytoestrogens it contains so they would be better to use almond milk, coconut milk, or orange juice) a banana and some frozen fruit and blend it until smooth. Then I drink it and take my other nutritional supplements while drinking it.

Kale is super high in fiber. This helps create the bulk I need to fill me up and to keeps me full for a long time. With a combination of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients, kale is a dieter’s dream food. This leafy vegetable is popular since ancient Greek and Roman times. It is low fat, no cholesterol but health benefiting antioxidant rich greens.

Nutrients in kale offer protection from vitamin-A deficiency, osteoporosis, iron-deficiency anemia, and believed to protect from cardiovascular diseases and colon and prostate cancers.

Kale is high in calcium. Per calorie, kale has more calcium than milk, which aids in preventing bone loss, preventing osteoporosis and maintaining a healthy metabolism. Kale is a great detox food. Kale is filled with fiber and sulfur, both great for detoxifying your body and keeping your liver healthy.

Kale, like other members of the cabbage family, contains health-promoting phytochemicals, sulforaphane, and indole-3-carbinol to protect against prostate and colon cancers.

Di-indolyl-methane (DIM), a metabolite of indole-3-carbinol is an effective immune modulator, antibacterial and antiviral agent through its action of potentiating “Interferon-Gamma” receptors.

Kale is also rich in ß-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. These flavonoids have potent antioxidant and anti-cancer activities. β -carotene converts to vitamin-A in the human body.

Zeaxanthin, an important dietary carotenoid, is selectively absorbed into the retinal macula lutea in the eyes where it thought to provide antioxidant and protective light-filtering functions. Thus, it helps prevent retinal detachment and offer protection against “age-related macular degeneration disease” (ARMD) in the older adults.

It is very rich in vitamin-A. Four ounces of fresh leaves carry 9,990 IU of this vitamin, providing 333% of RDA. Vitamin A is essential for maintaining healthy mucosa, skin and vision. Foods rich in this vitamin are known to offer protection against lung and oral cavity cancers. It is also high in vitamin-K. One hundred grams provides about 587% of RDA. Vitamin-K has a potential role in bone health through promoting bone formation and strengthening. Adequate vitamin-K levels in the diet help limiting neuronal damage and it has been used in the treatment of patients who have Alzheimer’s disease.

Four ounces of fresh kale contain 120 mg or 200% of daily recommended levels of vitamin-C. Scottish curly leaf variety has even more of this vitamin (130 mg/100g). Vitamin-C is a powerful antioxidant, which helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents and scavenge harmful oxygen-free radicals.

This leafy vegetable is notably good in many B-complex groups of vitamins such as niacin, vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine), thiamin, and pantothenic acid, which are essential for substrate metabolism in the body.

It is also a rich source of minerals like copper, calcium, sodium, potassium, iron, manganese, and phosphorus. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium. Manganese used by the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Iron required for cellular oxidation and red blood cell formation. Kale is an excellent source of vitamins A, C, K and B6, calcium, potassium, copper and manganese. More specifically, according to the DRV, it contains 684 percent of vitamin K, 206 percent of vitamin A and 134 percent of vitamin C. Its sulforaphane content protects against cancer, as does indole-3-carbinol, which also aids in DNA cell repair.

Kelp

When it comes to nutrition, kelp is kale’s ocean-loving cousin.

A four-ounce serving of kelp has approximately 43 calories. Kelp consists of 76 percent carbohydrates, 14 percent protein and 10 percent fat. Kelp contains, per weight, more fiber than even brown rice — 6.2 grams of fiber per four ounces of wet weight — without high levels of starchy carbohydrates. Kelp contains significant levels of tryptophan, threonine, isoleucine, methionine, cysteine and valine. Kelp also contains lower levels of leucine, lysine, phenylalanine, tyrosine and histidine.

Kelp, aka brown seaweed, contains high amounts of iodine, potassium, magnesium, calcium and iron, as well as vitamins, antioxidants, phytonutrients, amino acids, omega-3 fats and fiber, together relaying impressive health benefits that are hard to ignore.

Kelp possesses anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties that have provided health benefits to the humans for eons.

It contains vitamins B1, B12, B2, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium and iodine. Kelp improves thyroid functioning and helps improve energy levels, weight loss, liver function, brain function, constipation, digestion, functioning of pituitary gland and pancreas, improve symptoms of arthritis and memory loss.

Kelp also has an excellent nutrient density rating for vitamin K, a very good for folate and magnesium and a good rating for calcium, iron and tryptophan. One ounce of kelp gives us twelve calories (just one percent of our dietary need of energy).  Kelp is also relatively low in fat (0.2g per 1 ounce serving).

Like other plants, kelp absorbs a great deal of minerals from the sea water and sea soil in which it grows. Kelp contains more than twice as much sodium as potassium, 233 milligrams to 89 milligrams per 100-gram serving. Kelp also contains high levels of magnesium, iron, iodine and calcium. You can also obtain important trace minerals from kelp including phosphorus, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium.

As a green vegetable, kelp contains very high levels of vitamin K, important for blood clotting and bone health. Kelp also contains high levels of folate, or vitamin B9, which is involved in energy production. You can also obtain moderate levels of vitamin A, E, C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid.

Many foods contain iodine, but nowhere near the tremendous amount in kelp. A single tablespoon provides a whopping 500 percent of the DRV. Nothing else comes close — not scallops, nor cod, nor yogurt.

Iodine also helps regulate your thyroid gland to produce strong, healthy hair, skin and nails, as well as to form thyroid hormones, thyroxine and triiodothyronine.5 It’s also essential for proper formation of your skeletal framework and regulating your body’s energy and brain metabolism in a process regulated by your pituitary gland.

The myelination process in the central nervous systems of newborns is another key function of the thyroid hormone. Balanced iodine in the mother’s body is imperative in pregnancy and breastfeeding for optimal development of the baby’s brain.

However, it’s important to understand that balancing your iodine levels is crucial. Specialists usually recommend around 150 micrograms daily. Consuming too much could lead to either hypo- or hyperthyroidism.

As a food, kelp aficionados laud its flavor as the ultimate, seawater-laced brine that’s the essence of umami. Nori, one of the most popular seaweed species, is dried in sheets to make sushi rolls. Other varieties include dulce, arame, (also called sea oak), deep green wakame, kombu, and spirulina.

Kelp may help prevent breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers by decreasing levels of the sex hormone estradiol. A review showed it induced cell death of prostate, liver, oral, pancreatic and other cancers, inhibits Helicobacter pylori, which causes stomach ulcers, and targets inflammatory skin conditions.

Further, kelp contains alginic acid, which protects the plants from bacteria, but in your body can reduce radiation exposure and prevent heavy metals from being absorbed.

Alginic acid in the seaweed kombu is known for its positive effects on diabetes, as well as its ability to coagulate blood. It prevents cavities, promotes digestive health, protects against flu, aids digestion, protects vision and maintains heart health.

Sodium alginate derived from kelp reduced radioactive strontium absorption in the intestines by 50 to 80 percent allowing calcium to be absorbed through the intestinal wall while binding most of the strontium, which is excreted from the body.

The iron in kelp helps form healthy blood and prevent anemia and the antioxidants fight free radicals, altogether ensuring the growth of strong bones and optimal muscle function. This iron is accompanied by a measurable amount of vitamin C. Since vitamin C acts to increase the bioavailability of plant iron, this combination creates a synergistic effect.

Because I live in Missouri, kelp is not readily available, so rather than eating fresh kelp, I take kelp supplements in the form of tablets. I take a tablet of kelp every morning when I drink my kale/banana/soymilk/frozen fruit smoothie and another one in the evening with supper.

Krill

The final K in my triple K is krill oil. Krill oil comes from krill, a shrimp-like crustacean found in the ocean and proven to be the most effective, powerful way to add omega-3’s into my diet.

Krill oil is more powerful than fish oil because of a little-known antioxidant called “astaxanthin”. Astaxanthin is the strongest antioxidant in the carotenoid family, creating the beautiful shades of red found within shrimp, salmon and krill.

University studies show astaxanthin to be up to 500 times more effective than vitamin E, One time more effective than beta-carotene and four times more effective than lutein in various measures of antioxidant effectiveness.

This antioxidant has a remarkable way of defending cells against the effects of free radicals. It is one of the few antioxidants capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier and able to shuttle essential nutrients throughout your body.

Krill oil is safer than fish oil because fish oil has high levels of mercury and PCBs. Krill is not exposed to these toxins because it is harvested from the Antarctic Ocean, where these dangerous chemicals are virtually non-existent.

The omega-3 fatty acids in krill oil are structured so they are more easily absorbed and broken down by my body. Most fish oils are structured in triglyceride form, making them difficult for our bodies to break down and convert therefore they are less effective.

Incorporating the triple Ks of Kale, Kelp, and Krill is not difficult. I love the flavor of my morning smoothie so much that I have replaced ice cream with this morning drink and feel more than satisfied. (This is a big deal for me because I love ice cream.) I simply drink the shake and swallow a kelp tablet and take a krill capsule in the morning and I find that the superfood nutrition provides me with more than enough nutritional satisfaction that I feel full well up until lunch time. I can eat a salad for lunch and not be starved by suppertime. My body knows it is getting the nutrition that I need so I don’t feel deprived. I am getting all the nutrition I need for a healthy, active lifestyle.

help from kelp photoKelp is one of those lesser known superfoods. To learn more about Kelp, Check out Cygnet Brown’s book Help from Kelp available on Amazon Kindle https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01C0QNN1O

Here’s what a recent reader, Monika Werner said about Help from Kelp:

“I’ve heard about Kelp before, a friend of mine swears by Kelp tea, but I’ve never knew exactly what Kelp is and what it is good for. Cygnet Brown does an outstanding job bringing all the information about Kelp together and how you can incorporate it into your daily diet. I put it into my morning smoothie and love it. I really enjoyed the information how Kelp is not just a nutritional powerhouse for us human beings, but it can be very beneficial for gardening and animals as well. Amazing information everybody should know about if you are interested in taking your healthy lifestyle up a notch.”


I would like to introduce you to my first Guest Blogger, Pam Young. I hope you enjoy this post as well as I have. Take it away Pam. . .

My indie project is “weird” because I broke a six hundred page memoir about an awakening experience into three separate stories and published it as a trilogy in just over a year. In blogging about it, I publicly explored my spiritual journey.

 

Writing and publishing the first three Burnout to Bliss books in such a limited time was exhausting. I also learned more about indie publishing and shared it on my blog, Skating Thru 2012. But the most important thing I learned was not about publishing. It was about why I had written the series.

 

Indie authors understand the “why” of writing books is as either “write to market” (to make money) or as a “passion piece” (something you want or need to do). Non-fiction authors are also advised to determine their “why” before they even start writing because it shapes your story.

 

In the beginning, mine was “passion piece” because I viewed it as a legacy for my nieces, who were now the same age I was when I had that remarkable two-year experience almost thirty years ago. It began with pervasive discomfort in my once-loved job as a professor and disappointment with my inability to find someone who could “see me.” My nieces could be having a similar experience!

 

But the “why” changed while writing the books.

Small

When I completed BURNOUT – How a Desert Lizard Restored My Faith, I believed it worth sharing because it highlighted the madness (psychotic episodes) of professional burnout. I knew I wasn’t the only one who had felt such despair.  And sharing personal experience, at least according to National Association of Memoir Writers, is why people write memoirs — to shed light on the way. I also hoped to instill respect for other spiritual paths because my return to faith happened in a strange way while camping with Mexican Indian Shamans.

 

 

 Small (4)

Cycling in the City – How I Got My Confidence Back told a different story. As the first break-away from the job, it relates discovering the depth of damage from burnout and what I did to get better. I know I’m not alone in the experience of realizing that life no longer works. I saw sharing my story as a helping others. Part Two of that book is a model I created for making severe changes, like breaking addictions. But that was not the only reason for writing it. Having just learned about Amazon “Shorts,” I wanted to experience writing one. This story seemed perfect for the exercise.

 

 

Small (5)

My understanding of “why am I writing this?” changed as I wrote 2 years, 1 Paycheck, 0 Plans – a story of healing because I realized the healing was continuing as I wrote. And it was not about forgiving the jealous friend who launched my journey. That was completed in my journals (1985-89). Instead, it was about Mom and the underlying reason for my being intensely depressed so long ago. I was making revisions when all the hidden, unexpressed rage suddenly had a voice. I felt as if Mom was there with me, encouraging me in spirit to do whatever it took.

 

 

My “why” for writing the series was no longer just a “passion piece” for my nieces. It wasn’t even about helping others. Instead, I now believe it was about healing old wounds so I could let go, surrender, and move on with my life. Some part of me must have known this would happen because in Book 1 the Preface identified the title for the next book as Surrender.

 

Finally understanding the true “why” for writing that trilogy, I am convinced that I was guided to do this project, not for others, but for myself — to complete the healing of events and my weird relationship with Mom that happened so very long ago.

 

[And it’s not finished yet. Book 4, BLISS, will be a book of lessons learned for having more joy in life. If you want to be among the first to know when it’s published, please visit Burnout to Bliss and click the red link below.]

____

Pam Young has been many things: inner city English teacher, professor, Holistic Health Practitioner, yoga and DansKinetics instructor, psychotherapist, masseuse, and self-empowerment workshop leader. Now she writes with the same intentions while living in the mountains with critters.

 

You can find her books on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, and other venues.

 

You can follow her on Twitter, Facebook, or her blog:

 

Facebook       https://www.facebook.com/drpamyoung

%d bloggers like this: