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Santa_Claus_face

When I was little, I was told that there was a Santa Claus. However, I figured out very quickly (at about 3 years old) that Old Saint Nicholas was a myth. I remember telling my friends at school that there wasn’t a Santa Claus and they treated me as though I were a villain! I vowed then and there that I wasn’t going to perpetuate the lie with my own children. However, as the years went by, I have since relaxed my views.

When my Eldest Son was Little

When my eldest son was little, we had gifts, but the gifts came from family members, not the mythical character. We didn’t have a Christmas tree or any of the other trappings that go with Christmas. We just shared gifts and the Christmas story.

A few years later, after my second son was born, I lightened up on some of the other holiday traditions. We had Christmas decorations and a tree. However, we still didn’t have Santa Claus as part of our celebration. I wasn’t letting a mythical character share the limelight in the celebrations surrounding the second most holy day in Christendom.

Another Ten Years Went By

When my sons were younger, I always told them not to share the fact that Santa was not real with their friends. I even told them the story of what I had to face when I told my friends that there was no Santa Claus.

As I got older, however, I began to see the lack of fun and imagination that comes with “not believing in Santa Claus”. I personally loved watching the Santa Clause with my boys. It was fun to pretend that Santa was real.

My second son was ten when my daughter was born. By the time she was born, Santa Claus was back into our Christmas traditions. The difference we made, however, was that everyone knew that Santa was pretend. My youngest was told from day one that Santa was not real, but we were going to pretend that he was real. We would talk about Santa like he was a real person, but if my daughter was confused about whether he was real or not, I would tell her that he was pretend.

The idea came from something that happened when my eldest was about six years old. I was out blackberry picking while he was talking ninety miles per minute at me. He was telling me a story that I knew was not true and I called him on it. He told me, “It’s just a story, Mom. It’s just a story!”

It’s just a Story

Personally, I have nothing against pretending with our children, especially about someone as benevolent as Santa Claus. Like other forms of fiction, we can use the Santa Claus myth to teach our children about giving to others. The Santa story is also a story that boosts the imagination and by pretending the Santa character with our children, we can build our relationship with them. It is important for everyone to know the truth about the Santa character. Understanding the difference between fact and fiction is a concept that children can be introduced to early and Santa is a reasonable way to introduce this concept to our children.

But was Santa Claus just a fictional character? No, he wasn’t.

Based on a Real Person

Santa Claus was not just a story, however, and it is important for children to understand the history behind the story. Santa is based on St. Nicholas, born around 280 AD in what is now Turkey. Nicholas was known for helping the poor. By 1600, he was a popular saint, especially in Holland, where he was known as Sinter Klaas. By 1800, Dutch emigrants had introduced him to the United States, later helped by the writer Washington Irving passing on their stories about him, and by Clement Clarke Moore’s 1822 poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas”.

What Do You Think?

What do you think about the Santa Claus Myth? Do you promote it with your children? Do you ignore it all together, or do you, like me, use Santa Claus to teach your children (or grandchildren) about life?


main streetI cringe every time I hear someone say that some way of thinking is “common sense”. One reason is that I feel that common sense comes from a limited way of thinking. Common sense usually is regarded when one person who has been in a specific group of people that has a limited mindset. These people are exclusive unto themselves. Who wants to be common?

As I see it, the idea of common sense is rather bigoted. When a person says that something is “common sense, it means that because you don’t believe like we believe, you’re less than average. You’re not even good enough to be common when you don’t believe what is common to society. Common sense is “in-the-box-thinking.”

Developing Un-Common Sense

I prefer un-common sense or out of the box thinking. Out of the box thinking is creative thinking. I think that I have been a creative thinker all my life and I think that stems from having less than most children when I was growing up.

I Had Creative Parents

It also stems from having parents who grew up during the depression, who also had to be creative. When my mother was little, her playhouse was the shade of an apple tree. She played with her dolls under that tree. My Dad used to tell us stories about things that his brothers and sisters used to do. I remember he said that during the winter, he made barrel stave skis that he used every winter.

Though we never seemed to have enough money everything we wanted, we never had our utilities shut off or were ever without food. My parents always found creative ways to make ends meet. When I was growing up, my mother did a lot of gardening, canning, and freezing produce. I learned self-sufficiency from her.

We didn’t always have money to have birthday parties, but that didn’t stop us from creating them anyway. We would make decorations from construction paper that we recycled at the end of the previous school year. We baked a made from scratch birthday cake from baking supplies that my mother always had on hand. Often, we didn’t have powdered sugar, but my mother was always able to make frosting using egg whites (we often had our own chickens) and white sugar. Sometimes we drank Kool-Aid and other times us kids would pool our cash together and buy dime sodas (we called it “pop”). We would make our birthday gifts.

Books to Encourage Curiosity

We had access to books and my parents encouraged us to read. One of the things that they did spend money on when I was a child was a set of World Book Encyclopedias and a set of Child Craft Books. They used to help us look up things in those books. I loved learning and still do thanks to the uncommon sense that both of my parents had in raising their children.

How about you? What makes you uncommon?

 

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