Archive

Monthly Archives: March 2020


Our island in the sky is trying to tell us something, are we listening?
Our island in the sky is trying to tell us something. Are we listening?

An Unseen Virus

Now we have the effects of Covid-19 which have been devastating to us humans. It has shut down all the things that modern society have until a few weeks ago took for granted as necessities in our lives. Our extracurricular activities are being put on hold. Even our education and our jobs are being curtailed as day by day the numbers increase.

“Though the problems of the world are increasingly complex, the solutions remain embarrassingly simple.”

Bill Mollison

One of the principles in permaculture is that the problem is part of the solution, especially when you’re dealing with nature. The reason that nature does what it does is to create that balance that we talking about. The answer to the problem of being able to deal with Covid-19 is in understanding what nature is trying to tell us.

With major upheaval in our lives almost on a daily basis right now, it seems to me as though nature is unleashing her fury on humankind to bring herself back into balance.

The unprecedented floods and wild fires weren’t enough to get our attention. Current economic policies haven’t helped matters, in fact, in many ways they have made it worse. In the quest for the almighty dollar, regulations have been lessened allowing for land to be stripped of its trees to make way intensive farming practices that strip the soil from the earth. Air regulations have been lessened so that industries can reduce the cost of pollution containment. The effects on nature however, have been positive in that in places like China and Italy where air pollution has been noticeably diminished. This virus however serves as only a warning.

“If my people who are called by my name will humble themselves and pray and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways then I will hear from Heaven and heal their land.”

I Chronicles 7:14

Our answer is in reconnecting with our creator and his creation. We were created to tend the garden called Earth. We were made from the dust of the earth. In the cool of the evening, God would come and commune with Adam as he tended the garden. My suggestion to all of us is for us to take time of quarantine to reconnect with nature and God. If there’s any way for you to get outside, plant a garden and talk to God. If you’re not able to because of the quarantine, take the time to learn about how to naturally tend the earth, then start after quarantine is lifted. Go to a park. Go to a local farm. Do something to reconnect with what God gave us. And pray. Prayer is just talking with our creator.

What I am Doing

I am not just suggesting something that I wouldn’t do. The area where I live hasn’t been impacted much yet so I am taking this narrow window that I still have to get out to my property in the country so that I can start my gardens. Today I am packing up and tomorrow actually moving to what will be The Jerjoboch Permaculture Learning Center.

Please, even if you can’t get out, take the time to read my gardening book.

AND PLEASE STAY SAFE


This was a Garden I had several years ago. This year, it will be even better!

Have you been thinking about putting in a vegetable garden this year, but aren’t sure whether it is worth it to you? Here are ten good reasons to vegetable garden.

Better Tasting vegetables

If you have never grown tomatoes in your own garden and eaten one right after picking, you don’t know how good a tomato can taste. There’s nothing like eating a tomato fresh off the vine, unless it’s corn on the cob eaten at the peak of ripeness within fifteen minutes of picking. When my siblings and I were growing up, we all enjoyed vegetables and I think part of the reason for that was that our mom had a vegetable garden.

Healthier vegetables

I have always grown my vegetables by improving the soil using organic methods. I’ll never forget the time when a few years back we were selling our place and I was showing a perspective buyer my garden. He couldn’t believe that my garden soil had been produced there on site using nothing more than homemade compost, sawdust from a local sawmill and leaves for mulch, and a little kelp thrown into the tomato planting holes. Healthier soils make for healthier plants which make for healthier vegetables which makes for a healthier you.

Less expensive for higher quality vegetables

Organic vegetables are great, but let’s face it, they cost more than “conventionally grown” vegetables. When you grow your own vegetables, especially if you work your garden by hand, you’ll discover that you can grow your own for a lot less. Take for instance, spinach. A package of spinach costs about $5 or more and may last about a week. However, if you were to grow your own, that same $5 could be spent on a package of spinach seed which could last you all summer. If you learn how to save seeds, a package of an heirloom squash or cucumber seeds (which is easy to save) can last indefinitely.

Fresh air and sunshine

Nothing beats getting out in the garden for providing fresh air and sunshine. Get out in the garden in the morning or in the evening rather than midday. You get the benefits of vitamin D without the skin damage.

Physical Exercise

Hand working your garden is better for your health than using mechanical devices. The bending and stretching of hand working your garden provides a workout that pays. Not only do you get a workout, but you get fresh vegetables in the process.

Mental Rest

The gentle labors of working in my garden allow me to allow my mind to wander. I don’t feel pressed to stress over issues in live, but I can mull over my thoughts and discover solutions to problems that might not be as readily accessed when I am anxious about finding an answer.

Immunity

As already stated, healthy soil creates healthy microbes and healthy microbes produce healthy plants which produce healthy animals and humans. Understanding what produces healthy soil promotes immunities in plants which is passed on to their animal consumers. Which, in turn, produce healthier wastes that promote healthy soil and the cycle continues improving immunity throughout the ecosystem.

Immunity can be found in the heat of compost just as it is in the fever of a human. Microbes are attracted to decomposing vegetation and manures and their consuming of those nutrients releases the calories which produce heat. The heat neutralizes disease causing microbes and even weed seeds and turns what was waste products into nutrition that eventually plants can utilize.

In humans the heat of a fever also kills off disease causing microbes from parasites to bacteria to viruses. Fortunately, under normal circumstances disease causing microbes are more susceptible to the heat than their human hosts.

In both processes helpful microbes feed off the disease causing ones and remain in the soil providing synergy with the host that strengths both the helpful microbes as well as human immunity.

Spiritual Connection

I sense a spiritual connection with the ecosystem, the universe, and even the creator of the universe when I am gardening. The wonders of God’s creation are obvious to me as I go about the gardening chores. I am in awe of the natural processes that I wouldn’t see if I bought my vegetables at the grocery or even the farmer’s market. As I labor in the garden, I become part of the circle of life. I am one with nature and the creator of all.Social Connection

When gardening can become a joint effort among family members, it creates social bonds that are so often missing these days. What the cell phone takes away, learning to garden together can return to the family unit. Similar to the spiritual connection, it creates a social connection with those who participate in the gardening experience. It creates a sense of belonging, a sense of connection with one another.

Positive Effect on Environment

When growing your own garden, you have a way of recycling items that you use on site. You can use containers for growing plants that might otherwise end up in a landfill. You can use cardboard, yard wastes, woodchips, and shredded paper as mulch.

You can use your vegetable plants as ground cover which protects the soil, nourishes soil life and conserves water.

You can recycle manures, household food scraps and yard wastes not used as mulch by making compost. You can either make compost using the hot compost method or by creating worm compost.

 Your food isn’t traveling across continents to get to your home. Therefore, you’re reducing your contribution to the extensive use of fossil fuels.

Various items can be used as trash to treasure all you need to do is use your imagination.

Okay, so there’s my list of ten things that vegetable gardening does for me. Can you think of more? If so, share your ideas below.

Also, if you’re looking for a good book that can help you learn more about vegetable gardening, check out my book Simply Vegetable Gardening In print or on Kindle.


Three Thumbs Up (I like it so much, I had to borrow someone else’s thumb!)

A couple months ago I was talking with my son Jonathan and he brought up a movie that he had seen that he knew that I would like. It is called The Biggest Little Farm. For that matter, he said that the entire movie reminded him of me. He said that he was so sure that I would like it that he would send it to me. I watched an interview about the movie online. Here’s the link https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=the+biggest+little+farm+movie&&view=detail&mid=465DA1090C4E35AA3C28465DA1090C4E35AA3C28&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=%2Fvideos%2Fsearch%3Fq%3Dthe%2Bbiggest%2Blittle%2Bfarm%2Bmovie%26qpvt%3Dthe%2Bbiggest%2Blittle%2Bfarm%2Bmovie%26FORM%3DVDRE

It arrived on a Thursday, but because I had a list of other things I needed to finish, I didn’t watch it until Sunday. I was glad that I waited until Sunday to watch The Biggest Little Farm because it was something that I am glad that I was able to watch at my leisure.

What is it About?

The movie was about a couple John and Mollie Chester who adopted a black dog with blue eyes called Todd. Todd didn’t like being alone and would bark while they were gone. This didn’t bode well with the apartment dwelling neighbors. They were evicted, but Mollie had a dream and John went along with that dream. They found a financial backer and then found land an hour from Los Angeles to make this dream come true.

Their dream was to grow everything they could in harmony with nature. They hired a professional permaculturalist named Alan Miller to help them do what it was they really wanted to do. The movie followed them through the next seven years and demonstrated the downs as well as the high points.

Movie with a Heart

The Biggest Little Farm isn’t just a documentary. It is and entertaining movie. It includes stories that provided drama as well as comic relief. (The Emma Pig and Greasy Rooster Affair) It is a movie that the whole family can enjoy. I definitely recommend it to anyone who wants to make a transition into a healthier lifestyle or to anyone who thinks this lifestyle is a cake walk, and it encourages those who are struggling in this journey.

Observe and Learn

My biggest take away was when John makes a very important discovery around the seventh year, and that is this: Observe before making changes. When you see what’s going on, and understand it, the answers and solutions become obvious. The problem in one area can be the solution to a problem in another. It will be lesson that I plan to implement when I move to my homestead this spring.

I liked it so much I have to share it with everyone!

I am going to be showing this movie to as many people as I can. As my son Jonathan recognized, does sound a lot like what I want to do.

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: